Monday, 6 November 2017

Placement - Type 1 Diabetes and Epilepsy

In the summer I got diagnosed officially with Epilepsy. I had been having seizures for a while but just put that down to having Type 1 Diabetes, but when I had a seizure not related to my blood sugar, I realised that it was something more. At first it was hard to accept that I had another thing to consider and factor into things, something I had to declare when I started new jobs. I found it daunting because when I just had Type 1 Diabetes, it was easy for me to explain that I would control things, but the nature of epilepsy is that it is unpredictable. I got by the Epilepsy team that there are things that lower my seizure threshold, including alcohol, stress and being tired, and being stressed and tired are normal in my life at the moment.


I study a course at University called Community Learning and Development (CLD), and as part of that I go on work placement for a whole semester. Obviously, when I started that I had to state that I lived with both Type 1 Diabetes and Epilepsy, and my worry was that I would get coddled and treated differently due to this. I was also worried that being diabetic would affect some of the work I did, for example, if my blood sugar was high I wouldn't be able to concentrate the same way and it would affect my work, or I would have to take some days off due to a seizure. Most of all, I just don't want it to affect me being successful at university.



Selfie with Nicola Sturgeon I got while on placement!
Right from the start, everyone was lovely. No one even took it as a factor when asking me to complete work. They treated me as an absolute equal, which I was really happy about. I told everyone at the start that I would let them know if I wasn't well or if I needed anything, and they have been really respectful in terms of hospital appointments. It is always on the back of my mind though.

I have said it before, that Type 1 Diabetes is 24/7, it doesn't just go away after you give insulin. It factors into everything you do, and as placement is very unpredictable in terms of routine it is often a bit more difficult to control my blood sugar. I don't get everything perfect, and this means that the work I do at placement drains me even more. Even if my blood sugar is slightly higher than it should be, I get tired and have to try harder to concentrate. This means that when I finish my working day, I am often so exhausted and find it hard to do anything else in the evening. I am doing placement for 35 hours a week, and I also have to do a portfolio of my practice, and I find it hard to keep up with the portfolio because I am so tired. Not having the time or energy to do this work stressed me out, and the fact that I was stressed made me even more stressed due to me having epilepsy.

I also oversubscribe myself a lot. I play netball, volunteer, and after placement and my Uni work, I am absolutely drained, and throughout this it is always playing on my mind that being tired and stressed can lower my seizure threshold, but I desperately don't want to give up anything I do, and I am absolutely determined not to let Type 1 Diabetes or Epilepsy hold me back doing anything. That is just me being stubborn, and that is how I slowly and accidently burnt myself out.

Me dressing up for placement Halloween event!
I am having such a good experience on placement. I enjoy all the volunteering I do. I enjoy playing netball. I just have to admit to myself that I can't do everything, that I have to take a break and make time for my health. I have in no way figured out how to do this, but I have cut back the amount of volunteering I do, and I haven't stressed about doing exercise, but I still try to do as much as I can. I have also tried to make sure that if I do have alcohol (I am a Uni student so alcohol is almost inevitable!) that I have some downtime afterwards in case something does happen.
I did have a point where I was so burnt out that I wanted to quit. I didn't talk to anyone, I didn't go to netball and I ignored the ever-growing pile of work that I had. I did the bare minimum, then came home and watched TV. I then realized that I just needed to take some time for myself every now and then, understand that I do have limitations (as much as I hate to admit it!) and for the time being, I need to scale back.

And although I haven't quite figured out how to do this yet, I am working on it. I know that placement is only until the end of the semester, but after that I will have other things happening. I just need to take time every week to figure out what self-care I need to do, whether it be talking to friends, family or just having a day doing absolutely nothing.

Until next time,

Alyssa

No comments:

Post a Comment

My name is Alyssa Faulkner. I am a Type 1 Diabetic Teen living in Scotland. I currently use a Medtronic insulin pump and an Enlite CGM, and am a volunteer for Diabetes Scotland.